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Looking for girlfriend or boyfriend > 30 years > Can a man get hiv from breast milk

Can a man get hiv from breast milk

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The medical advice given to women living with HIV about infant feeding has changed many times over the past 20 years and is likely to continue to evolve. The advice given also differs according to where you live. In the UK and other high-income countries, the safest way for a mother living with HIV to feed her baby is to bottle feed using formula milk. In low income countries however, you may be advised to breastfeed. This is because overall it is safer for a child to have breast milk containing HIV than infant formula made with unsafe water and bottles that have not been sterilised.

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Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)

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Mother-to-child transmission can occur during pregnancy, birth, or breastfeeding. The best way to prevent transmission of HIV to an infant through breast milk is to not breastfeed. In the United States, where mothers have access to clean water and affordable replacement feeding infant formula , CDC and the American Academy of Pediatrics external icon recommend that HIV-infected mothers completely avoid breastfeeding their infants, regardless of ART and maternal viral load. Healthcare providers should be aware that some mothers with HIV may experience social or cultural pressure to breastfeed.

In resource-limited settings, such as some parts of Africa, the World Health Organization WHO recommends that HIV-infected mothers breastfeed exclusively for the first 6 months of life and continue breastfeeding for at least 12 months, with the addition of complementary foods. These mothers should be given ART to reduce the risk of transmission through breastfeeding.

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Breast is always best, even for HIV-positive mothers

Breastfeeding may be natural, but it is not always simple. Then when they become discouraged, they are told to stop breastfeeding altogether and to give artificial substitutes. If the mother is HIV positive, more uncertainty is added. Until recently, the World Health Organization WHO advised HIV-positive mothers to avoid breastfeeding if they were able to afford, prepare and store formula milk safely.

More than 15 percent of new HIV infections occur in children. Without treatment, only 65 percent of HIV-infected children will live until their first birthday, and fewer than half will make it to the age of two. Although breastfeeding is attributed to a significant number of these infections, most breastfed infants are not infected with HIV, despite prolonged and repeated exposure.

Mother-to-child transmission can occur during pregnancy, birth, or breastfeeding. The best way to prevent transmission of HIV to an infant through breast milk is to not breastfeed. In the United States, where mothers have access to clean water and affordable replacement feeding infant formula , CDC and the American Academy of Pediatrics external icon recommend that HIV-infected mothers completely avoid breastfeeding their infants, regardless of ART and maternal viral load. Healthcare providers should be aware that some mothers with HIV may experience social or cultural pressure to breastfeed. In resource-limited settings, such as some parts of Africa, the World Health Organization WHO recommends that HIV-infected mothers breastfeed exclusively for the first 6 months of life and continue breastfeeding for at least 12 months, with the addition of complementary foods.

Can HIV be transmitted through breast milk?

Sexual intercourse vaginal and anal : Anal and vaginal intercourse are high-risk activities. In the penis, vagina and anus, HIV may enter through cuts and sores many of which would be very small and hard to notice , or directly through the mucus membranes. Oral sex mouth-penis, mouth-vagina : There are cases where HIV was transmitted orally, so it's not completely without risk to have HIV-infected semen, vaginal fluid or blood in your mouth. However, oral sex is considered a low risk practice. The virus can't survive well in the mouth in semen, vaginal fluid or blood , so the risk of HIV transmission through the mouth, throat and gums is lower than through vaginal or anal contact. Sharing injection needles: Sharing needles or other materials used for injecting is considered a high-risk practice. Injection needles can pass blood directly from one person to another if you share them. If a person with HIV injects with a needle then shares it with another person, the second person is at very high risk for getting HIV. Mother to Child: Transmission from mother to childe is now rare in developed countries because pregnant women who are HIV-positive are given medications to prevent the fetus from getting infected.

Breast milk kills HIV and blocks its oral transmission in humanized mouse

Two cases of HIV transmission from mother to infant during the breastfeeding period when mothers had an undetectable viral load have been reported by PROMISE, a large international study of the effectiveness of antiretroviral treatment in preventing vertical HIV transmission. Earlier this year an international group of researchers called for more research to determine if HIV can be transmitted through breast milk even if the breastfeeding mother has an undetectable viral load in blood. Swiss doctors have argued that pregnant women with HIV should be informed of the uncertain evidence about the risk of transmission during breastfeeding, and rather than being prohibited from breastfeeding while taking antiretroviral drugs, should be supported to breastfeed safely through regular viral load testing and education about factors that might increase the risk of transmission, such as mastitis. The World Bank classifies countries according to their income: low, lower-middle, upper-middle and high. There are around 50 lower-middle income countries mostly in Africa and Asia and around 60 upper-middle income countries in Africa, Eastern Europe, Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean.

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Feb 12, - We evaluated the probability of breast-milk transmission of HIV-1 per liter of of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is a complex process that can Although several studies have demonstrated a relationship between longer of HIV transmission per sexual contact: the case of male-to-female  by BA Richardson - ‎ - ‎Cited by - ‎Related articles.

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