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Looking for girlfriend or boyfriend > 30 years > Why do guys get urinals

Why do guys get urinals

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This happens in my psychiatry office, but it happens in gym locker rooms and social gatherings and business settings, too. A side benefit of being a trained listener as well as a journalist is that I can eventually share the insights I glean—without attribution, of course—with the public. Again and again over the years, and not in small numbers, men have confided to me that they find urinals anxiety-provoking—even humiliating. They still hesitate, if only momentarily, before unbuttoning their trousers and unzipping their flies while men stand on either side of them, holding their private parts, staring forward hopefully at white ceramic tiles. Are they shy, or something? Even more off-putting than urinals, men tell me, are the group troughs that they are still encouraged to use at some stadiums.

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SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Different Types Of Guys At The Urinal!!!

The Men with Urinals in Their Homes

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Illustration: Eliot Wyatt. It's a busy Saturday evening in my local pub. After three vodka sodas with fresh lime and a splash of cranberry yes, I'm gay , the familiar tingle of my bladder greets me. After heading to the men's toilets, my fears are confirmed: they're mobbed. Not only is the cubicle engaged, but the dreaded queue for urinals is, unlike me, in full flow. For a man who doesn't like peeing at urinals, these circumstances present two choices.

First, you wait in a separate, somehow more humiliating queue for a cubicle, publicly signalling to every man in sight that you're desperate for a shit — even though you aren't. Alternatively, you can wait it out, hoping that when you get there your bladder will perform. Regrettably, I choose the second option. After about 30 seconds of inaction, the panic sets in, soon evolving into full-blown mental catastrophe as I realise that nothing is coming. I quickly improvise a performance of faux penis shaking and hand drying, before exiting sheepishly.

I've always hated using urinals. It almost always ends in the above result, unless I've had seven of my beloved vodka sodas. As a gay man, I've got no beef with penises in most situations — in fact, quite the opposite — but the expectation to use a urinal and to pee standing up are the two biggest downsides of penis ownership.

At home, I take a leisurely approach, often sitting down while judging other people's meals on Instagram. But as soon as I enter a public toilet, I'm out as quick as possible. It turns out I'm not alone in my urinal antipathy.

James, 29, tells me that, around five years ago, he began getting "stage fright" when using urinals. But if there's another person in there and there's a spare cubicle, I'll use that. It's common for men who use urinals to position themselves far away from other men. In fact, online urinal simulator urinalman.

Used almost 3 million times, the simulator reveals that the majority pick urinals that are furthest away from other men when given different options. But there are exceptions to this rule. I'd never met my girlfriend's dad, so was keen to make a good impression," he explains.

In the post-film rush I ended up pissing next to my father-in-law, because the long queue dictated which urinal became available. I was unable to pee and I was so embarrassed — to this day, I still wonder if he noticed. I've not used one since. According to registered psychologist Rachel Hard, Paruresis — or "shy bladder" — is extremely common in men.

It essentially refers to finding it difficult, or being unable, to urinate when others are around. It is impacted by stress, which causes a tightening of the sphincter muscle, preventing urine from passing. Senior therapist Sally Barker agrees that pee-related tension is one of the most common forms of male social anxiety.

She describes it as an example of a typically male "all or nothing" style of thinking: "Men sometimes allow an experience of slight anxiety or uncomfortableness around peeing in public to dominate their thinking, until they feel completely blocked, forgetting any occasions when they were problem-free. Both Rachel and Sally mention that childhood memories of using public toilets — particularly near older strangers or family members in scenarios that seemed intimidating — can haunt men into their adult lives.

I certainly remember being a little boy and not wanting to go into the men's toilets alone, so my mum would often take me in with her instead. It's similar to how I feel in a gym locker room, which I find pretty triggering because they remind me of school changing rooms — but at least there I'm not required to perform a bodily function. Other gay men I spoke to shared Stephen's unease in "men's spaces".

The shame that gay children can feel as they resist being "conditioned to live in a heterosexual world" can be particularly intense in "men's spaces", such as toilets and changing rooms. These gendered spaces were founded on the assumption of heterosexuality, making it uncomfortable to navigate them.

But in gay venues I find it easier to relax because it's already presumed that I'm gay. Feeling comfortable enough to use urinals is a recurring theme — and not just among gay men. If I'm out of my comfort zone I might feel too insecure, but if it's somewhere that I feel in my element, then I'll pee near anyone.

Because men are often shamed for being vulnerable, discussing these insecurities can be difficult. Young boys are already aware of the pressure to be "brave" when they first venture into the adult toilets. Confidence coach Lisa Phillips reasons that urinals — and potential failure to "perform" at them — present "a risk of being shamed externally when the individual already feels internal shame". Phillips suggests that childhood shame can stay with us.

As an adult, unless I really, really need to go, it won't come out while I stand — it just feels unnatural. I'd pulled my pants all the way down, so was mid-way through being mocked for that.

But then they noticed what my willy looked like. I quickly got into the habit of using a cubicle after that. Men struggle with peeing at urinals for a variety of reasons, but a recurring theme is a specific time where they felt uncomfortable of suffered from confidence issues. Unsurprisingly, given that the penis is so frequently referred to as our "manhood", the inability to conform to the expectation to pee publicly, standing close to each other, can be frustrating.

Urinals and public toilets are a space where the performance of masculinity — in which we all partake in different ways — can be difficult to reconcile with emotions tied to upbringing, sexuality, culture or a desire for privacy. We men — both the pee-shy and the pee-bold — should absolutely continue talking about the parts of life that make us uncomfortable. But pee at a urinal? You've got to be taking the piss. Screen shot via Urinal Man, showing where most men would choose to stand given this free urinal configuration.

In Defense of the Urinal iPhone Guys

A few days ago, I asked my male friends — via Facebook, of course — some simple questions about a device we all use most of the time, but never discuss. I had several very important questions: 1. Why are they so low that as a result men piss on the floor?

Long ago, the gods disproportionately granted to men positions of power in politics, business, science and the arts — power they still exercise to this day. But there was a cost: they would have their dignity affronted routinely and be expected to conduct one of their most delicately personal acts in public.

While this typically does not apply to waterless urinals, water-using urinals often have urinal screens placed at the bottom of the urinal. These urinal screens typically there for two purposes:. For decades, they contained chemicals to help reduce odors, but many of those chemicals are now banned. They helped prevent larger debris from entering the urinal drain and causing a blockage.

What Men Really Think About Urinals

Illustration: Eliot Wyatt. It's a busy Saturday evening in my local pub. After three vodka sodas with fresh lime and a splash of cranberry yes, I'm gay , the familiar tingle of my bladder greets me. After heading to the men's toilets, my fears are confirmed: they're mobbed. Not only is the cubicle engaged, but the dreaded queue for urinals is, unlike me, in full flow. For a man who doesn't like peeing at urinals, these circumstances present two choices. First, you wait in a separate, somehow more humiliating queue for a cubicle, publicly signalling to every man in sight that you're desperate for a shit — even though you aren't.

NewStatesman

Top definition. That thing us guys piss in. Girl: What is that funny looking thing on the wall in the men's bathroom? Guy: That's a urinal.

Urinals are often provided in public toilets for male users in Western countries less so in Muslim countries. They are usually used in a standing position.

Rule number one when using the urinals: you do NOT talk when using the urinals — no matter the location. This rule even applies if you step into the toilets with somebody you know. Urinal etiquette dictates that if you cross paths even with a long lost relative you can only acknowledge each other with an eyebrow raise and upward nod until outside the facilities.

Men reveal the unspoken rules of using a public urinal

In terms of adhering to social norms, few places are as stringent as a public bathroom. Making eye contact with a stranger or accidentally bumping someone might elicit a fumbling apology on say, a crowded subway car, but in a public bathroom, those are the actions of a madman. You should never be standing so close as to make physical contact even remotely possible.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: B 501 Assisting with a Urinal

If you look online, you can find countless articles about why you need a urinal in your home. But who are the guys who actually have these urinals? As it turns out, there are a fair number of them, and while each has their own reason for wanting an at-home urinal, they all agreed on one simple truth: Having a urinal in your home is nothing short of amazing. We had this drain left over from where the old shower used to be, so I had the idea of putting a urinal in there because we had the space and we already had the plumbing for it. For us, it just made sense.

Everything That’s Ever Baffled You About Guys and Urinals—Explained

Like many millennials, Curtis got his first mobile phone when he entered his freshman year of high school. He was 15 years old, and his first Nokia went with him everywhere. So why not take the opportunity? Why would anyone risk the splashback? When you are at a bar urinal and you hear an iPhone picture be taken… pic. Brandt, a year-old in Denver, brings his phone to the urinal for similar reasons. If you're looking for me at Macworld, I'm the guy who wasn't using his iPhone at a urinal.

Sep 25, - I mean, I get it if there are three and they have to be the middle man, but when there is a wall of urinals and someone uses the stall, respect is lost.

When my editor asked me if I was up for writing some answers to questions women have about urinals, I immediately accepted. If he is able to, your average man will always leave a urinal in between himself and another guy. Because some dudes get weirded out when others stand directly next to them to take a leak when other urinal stalls are open.

8 Public Bathroom Secrets Guys Won’t Tell You

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